Judicial Review in the Federal Court of Canada

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A. v. Canada

My client was charged with possession of cocaine inside a maximum security prison. The evidence against him was confirmation by a NIK test that the substance was cocaine. This test is widely used by police and prisons, but my argument that it was not proof beyond a reasonable doubt persuaded the Federal Court to disavow the test.

T. v. Canada

Mr. T. was charged with possession of a weapon inside a maximum security prison. I challenged the guilty verdict on both facts and law, and won on both. The result helped to narrowly define possession and to expand the scope of reasonable doubt in the prison context.

W. v. Canada

Mr. W. was twice charged with and convicted of refusing to take a urinalysis test inside a maximum security prison. I challenged both decisions based on the argument that prison staff must have reasonable grounds to support such demands. The result was clarification of the fairness of prison urinalysis procedures.